Jayne Walsh sells headphones to a student.

Jayne Walsh does more than sell books

Food dri­ves are just one of the ways this HACC employee gives back   Jayne Walsh is no stranger to the world of retail. Before becom­ing the man­ager of the book store at the Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) Lan­caster cam­pus in 2005, Walsh had worked both in cloth­ing retail as well as real estate. This

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Higher One faces stiff criticism from students

Cus­tomer Ser­vice in spot­light as a major focus of student frustration In the past two years Higher One’s rep­u­ta­tion has not been the best. Law­suits against the com­pany have left some stu­dents with some extra cash in their accounts due to hid­den fees courts have ruled against in favor of stu­dents. The com­pany has also lost

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Indian Organization of Lancaster County displayed a table for the Multicultural Event October 21-23

International Club holds a three day awareness event

Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege Lan­caster cam­pus’ Inter­na­tional club recently held a 3-day event to increase stu­dent aware­ness to the many cul­tures that are around the county. The event took place from Octo­ber 21thru the 23 and was host to an array of speak­ers as well as food from around world. Indian Orga­ni­za­tion of Lan­caster County

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Staceyann Chin recited her poetry to HACC Students for National Coming Out Day. The event was sponsored by the Office of Student Life.

Poet, activist Staceyann Chin visits Lancaster campus

Activist brings humor, deep thought along­side National Com­ing Out Day On Thurs­day Oct. 9, 2014 Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) Lan­caster cam­pus had the plea­sure to host Spo­ken Word Poet and LGBT activist Staceyann Chin. The Jamaican native spoke to the gath­ered crowd in a very per­sonal and unex­pected man­ner. For­go­ing the pul­pit or the stage,

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Why so many stereotypes in America?

Minh Do — Con­tribut­ing Writer   Since I’m an immi­grant and have lived here for only one year, peo­ple tend to ask me ques­tions like, “What are the dif­fer­ences between Viet­nam and Amer­ica?” or “What is the most sur­pris­ing thing to you?” Of course, there are tons and tons of dis­may­ing and incon­ceiv­able things, but

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Lamont McNair performs at HACC Fest 2014

Monty’ McNair wants to be a role model

Lam­ont “Monty” McNair has had an inspir­ing jour­ney that landed him at Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) Lan­caster cam­pus. McNair is reach­ing the end of his sec­ond year as a Busi­ness Admin­is­tra­tion major, but also has inter­ests as an aspir­ing musician. McNair has been well received as a rap­per; he has even worked with rap

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Gamergate’ is a lost cause, but not its goals

Leigh Alexander records audio

   The con­tro­ver­sial event known as Gamer­gate began with the pro­posed goal of enforc­ing ethics in video game jour­nal­ism. How­ever, it has been met with con­sid­er­able back­lash due to the movement’s ties to harass­ment against female game design­ers and crit­ics. This cul­mi­nated with a story in the New York Times fea­tur­ing the movement’s hate­ful ele­ments. That is why I believe the pos­i­tive goal of the move­ment and those who sup­port that and shun the hate speech need to sep­a­rate and find a new ban­ner to ride under.

   With the afore­men­tioned sto­ries of harass­ment, what could those pos­i­tive parts be? Pos­i­tive and vocal mem­bers seem to be few and far between, drowned out by voices of hate and misog­yny in com­ment sec­tions and posts across the web.  The pos­i­tive voices would have you believe this is a focus on ethics for gam­ing jour­nal­ists to sep­a­rate them­selves from the devel­op­ers they are report­ing on. This is the noble cause I am refer­ring to, but the prob­lem I find is that it stems from a bro­ken narrative.

Jayne Walsh does more than sell books

Jayne Walsh sells headphones to a student.

Food dri­ves are just one of the ways this HACC employee gives back

 

Jayne Walsh is no stranger to the world of retail. Before becom­ing the man­ager of the book store at the Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) Lan­caster cam­pus in 2005, Walsh had worked both in cloth­ing retail as well as real estate. This back­ground gave her an edge in becom­ing the first offi­cial man­ager for the Lan­caster cam­pus book store.

 

Not long before Walsh began work­ing for HACC, there were no book stores on cam­puses besides Har­ris­burg. Instead stu­dents pur­chased through a sin­gle third party book seller who would come to cam­pus. The Stu­dent Gov­ern­ment Orga­ni­za­tions across the var­i­ous cam­puses of HACC advo­cated for the cre­ation of cam­pus book stores. Once con­fir­ma­tion came through, they began search­ing for staff to run them. Walsh was famil­iar with the col­lege and applied for the position.

Don’t Look in the Cellar’ doesn’t scare, it delights

Still from the film "Don't Look in the Cellar"

Indie film doesn’t hit the mark for hor­ror, can still enter­tain audiences

 

Hor­ror movies have the abil­ity to cap­ti­vate and draw their audi­ence to a ter­ri­fy­ing world unlike our own. “Don’t Look in the Cel­lar” is not one of them.

 

Don’t take that state­ment as a detri­ment to the film. Direc­tor Den­nis Devine and writer Car­los Perez have cre­ated a film that falls into the “so bad its funny” cat­e­gory. While the film fails among all major cri­te­ria for qual­ity, it treads the line between not tak­ing itself seri­ous and attempt­ing to make a good film.

 

Confessions of a registered something student #2

Danielle Shaver and her father Randy Shaver post with their four cats Cassy, Dodger, Bandit, and Angel.

Unlike most peo­ple with a learn­ing dis­abil­ity I need noise to help me con­cen­trate. There are always at least 20 dif­fer­ent thoughts in my head at all times. Some­times it is hard to sleep because my mind is not tired and con­tin­ues work­ing. The more noise and chaos that sur­rounds me the more I am able to focus.

Maybe this is a reflec­tion of the way my life feels to me. Col­lege is a reward­ing place, but it can also be beyond frus­trat­ing. I con­stantly feel over­whelmed and con­fused, though I work very hard. There just never seem to be enough hours in the day to accom­plish every­thing I need or want to do.

Higher One faces stiff criticism from students

Cus­tomer Ser­vice in spot­light as a major focus of student frustration

In the past two years Higher One’s rep­u­ta­tion has not been the best. Law­suits against the com­pany have left some stu­dents with some extra cash in their accounts due to hid­den fees courts have ruled against in favor of stu­dents. The com­pany has also lost the prof­its it once made. Those who fought them in court say this is due to the unjust fees being forced out. Col­leges across the coun­try are end­ing their rela­tion­ship with Higher One.

Stu­dents who have had to con­tact the Higher One cus­tomer ser­vice cen­ter often find them­selves frus­trated with the chal­lenge of get­ting the actual help of a live per­son. Last semes­ter stu­dents from the Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) Lan­caster cam­pus found them­selves in a bind when the Higher One ATM ran out of money. The machine printed receipts show­ing the full amount was with­drawn when in fact it was not. The con­fused and aggra­vated stu­dents went to the first place they thought of for help, the Wel­come Center.

International Club holds a three day awareness event

Indian Organization of Lancaster County displayed a table for the Multicultural Event October 21-23

Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege Lan­caster cam­pus’ Inter­na­tional club recently held a 3-day event to increase stu­dent aware­ness to the many cul­tures that are around the county. The event took place from Octo­ber 21thru the 23 and was host to an array of speak­ers as well as food from around world.

Indian Orga­ni­za­tion of Lan­caster County (IOLC) Pres­i­dent Deepa Balepur talked about their hol­i­day cel­e­bra­tion of Dewali, sim­i­lar to Christ­mas. She explained how the orga­ni­za­tion reaches out to the com­mu­nity to share their cul­ture to allow oth­ers to expe­ri­ence what India is like. They have taught at preschools as well as par­tic­i­pated in a per­for­mance at the Ephrata Market.

Poet, activist Staceyann Chin visits Lancaster campus

Staceyann Chin recited her poetry to HACC Students for National Coming Out Day. The event was sponsored by the Office of Student Life.

Activist brings humor, deep thought along­side National Com­ing Out Day

On Thurs­day Oct. 9, 2014 Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) Lan­caster cam­pus had the plea­sure to host Spo­ken Word Poet and LGBT activist Staceyann Chin. The Jamaican native spoke to the gath­ered crowd in a very per­sonal and unex­pected man­ner. For­go­ing the pul­pit or the stage, the for­mer “Oprah Win­frey Show” guest stood on the same level as those she spoke to, stalk­ing through the aisles and climb­ing on chairs as she spoke to the crowd and to individuals.

 

Chin read excerpts from her mem­oir, “The Other Side of Par­adise” in between bits of addi­tional com­men­tary and dis­cus­sion.  The title of the book refers to the town of Par­adise in Jamaica, where Chin spent most of her child­hood. The book itself focuses on Chin’s life grow­ing up on the island.

Why so many stereotypes in America?

Minh Do — Con­tribut­ing Writer

 

Since I’m an immi­grant and have lived here for only one year, peo­ple tend to ask me ques­tions like, “What are the dif­fer­ences between Viet­nam and Amer­ica?” or “What is the most sur­pris­ing thing to you?” Of course, there are tons and tons of dis­may­ing and incon­ceiv­able things, but I fig­ured that I wouldn’t want to offend a per­son I’ve just met by say­ing some­thing too seri­ous. As a matter-of-fact, they might not want to talk to me any­more. One of the most sur­pris­ing things to me is actu­ally the stereo­typ­ing in America.

I more than know that there is a lot of stereo­typ­ing in the world. Even so, in a mil­lion years, I would never have thought that Amer­i­cans do this much stereo­typ­ing. How can the place with Barack Obama as a pres­i­dent or Bey­oncé as a super star be like this? How about Will Smith, LeBron James, Oprah Win­frey, or Jen­nifer Lopez, Pene­lope Cruz, Marc Anthony, Ricky Mar­tin, etc.? The United States of Amer­ica is proud of its eth­nic diver­sity and mul­ti­cul­tur­al­ism, is it not? I can think of more and more rea­sons, and give hun­dreds of names to prove that any coun­try can have stereo­typ­ing, but America?

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