hbo-go-featured

HBO GO stutters, Xbox takes on the mantle

Robert Beiler Tech Edi­tor   HBO Go, the stream­ing ser­vice included with HBO sub­scrip­tions, had a ser­vice out­age on Sun­day night after the sea­son 4 pre­miere for ‘Game of Thrones’. The fatal error left many users unable to watch the pre­miere. HBO sent out a tweet regard­ing the out­age, apol­o­giz­ing to fans and inform­ing them More »

microsoft-xp

Windows XP: The End is Here

By Robert Beiler Tech Editor   The time has come. On Tues­day April 8th 2014, Microsoft offi­cially ended its extended sup­port on Win­dows XP for the major­ity of users. Some coun­tries such Ire­land and the UK have paid for addi­tional sup­port time, but for the main­stream user this will not be the case. What does More »

Confessions of a registered nursing student

A student’s per­sonal jour­ney through the nurs­ing program Shawn Reed — Editor-in-Chief I am con­vinced that Queen and David Bowie wrote “Under Pres­sure” after speak­ing to a room full of nurs­ing stu­dents. I think it’s safe to say as I scan my class­room that every­one is burned out. There is this uneasy surge in emo­tion More »

ReadersChoice

Nine time a winner

HACC wins reader’s choice award Char­lotte Fiehn — Staff Writer For nine straight years LancasterOnline.com has voted Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) the “Best Place to Take Col­lege Courses in Lancaster”. To cel­e­brate the announce­ment stu­dents and fac­ulty were treated to free cup­cakes on Octo­ber 17, 2013 “We [gave] out cup­cakes in the lobby of More »

Success

Success is in the details

Sim­ple Tips for a strong semester Desiree Kissinger — Staff Reporter Col­lege offers oppor­tu­ni­ties. It is the last moment in our lives where we can live in the limbo between adult life and stu­dent, mostly obliv­i­ous to the real­i­ties that lie in wait the moment we reach grad­u­a­tion. Sure, we have the wor­ries of what More »

Quiet afternoons at Muddy Run.

Muddy Run offers peace within

Get­ting close to nature in Holt­wood, PA Desiree Kissinger — Staff Writer In today’s fast-paced soci­ety, there are few places that can make one for­get about the wor­ries and momen­tum of every­day life. Few places that offer a sanc­tu­ary and a day of peace, where one can get lost in the awe-inspiring beauty that nature holds. More »

HBO GO stutters, Xbox takes on the mantle

hbo-go-featured

Robert Beiler

Tech Edi­tor

 

HBO Go, the stream­ing ser­vice included with HBO sub­scrip­tions, had a ser­vice out­age on Sun­day night after the sea­son 4 pre­miere for ‘Game of Thrones’. The fatal error left many users unable to watch the pre­miere. HBO sent out a tweet regard­ing the out­age, apol­o­giz­ing to fans and inform­ing them of restora­tion progress. The ser­vice saw a sim­i­lar issue dur­ing the March finale of ‘True Detec­tive’ as well, caus­ing some annoy­ance among the fan bases.

Windows XP: The End is Here

microsoft-xp

By Robert Beiler

Tech Editor

 

The time has come. On Tues­day April 8th 2014, Microsoft offi­cially ended its extended sup­port on Win­dows XP for the major­ity of users. Some coun­tries such Ire­land and the UK have paid for addi­tional sup­port time, but for the main­stream user this will not be the case. What does this mean for the aver­age user? It means mostly secu­rity risk. Many com­put­ers, includ­ing busi­nesses and devices like ATMs still use Win­dows XP. Com­put­ers run­ning Win­dows XP will con­tinue to func­tion as they have, but they will no longer receive secu­rity updates, patches, or ser­vice packs form Microsoft.

Confessions of a registered nursing student

A student’s per­sonal jour­ney through the nurs­ing program

Shawn Reed — Editor-in-Chief

I am con­vinced that Queen and David Bowie wrote “Under Pres­sure” after speak­ing to a room full of nurs­ing stu­dents. I think it’s safe to say as I scan my class­room that every­one is burned out. There is this uneasy surge in emo­tion that closely resem­bles des­per­a­tion.  Secretly we’re all think­ing the same thing. We’re all won­der­ing when this will end, if it will end, and if it will have to be done again. In our dreams we hear call bells and wake scream­ing nor­mal val­ues, and patho­phys­i­ol­ogy of dis­eases we may never treat.

My brain is fried. My words tend to fall out of my mouth and land in the ears of those lis­ten­ing to me in a dis­jointed series of sto­ries as I find myself des­per­ately try­ing to remem­ber how to speak.  I find myself think­ing in pic­tures and images and wish­ing that I could some­how down­load those images to other people.

Some­times I imag­ine that my class­mates and I are in some sort of sick real­ity show. I keep won­der­ing when some­one will tell me that I’ve won a new car, but when I open my eyes I’m still star­ing at a 1991 Buick Century.

I think the thing that reminds me why I get out of bed and do this to myself are the sto­ries I col­lect from patients and their fam­i­lies. On those days when I am not in a class room, or hunched over a book, the clin­i­cal floor serves to recon­nect my heart with the rea­son why I chose nurs­ing as a career.  I don’t really care about tasks that some view as tedious like the fill­ing of water, or the clean­ing of a patient because I view these as an exer­cise in trust.

The prob­lem therein lies; I can not turn the col­lec­tor in me off. I think some­where I must have a sign on my fore­head that says, “Tell me your story,” because I’ve had far too many instances lately of strangers ask­ing for my help in one way or another.  Now this would be fine if I wasn’t so tapped men­tally that every request out­side of those I am tasked to do irri­tates me. As I write this in the “Live Wire” office I am lis­ten­ing to the chat­ter­ing of peo­ple talk­ing next door in the piano room. I’m find­ing my cop­ing skills aren’t what they should be. I real­ize I have started to hate the sound of my own name. This is not neg­a­tiv­ity but rather hon­esty. It is hon­est of me to say that I, like other peo­ple, do have a limit on the amount of empa­thy or con­cen­tra­tion I am able to muster at any given time.

I write a line, lis­ten to the inces­sant gig­gling next door, and then watch a Vine only to come back try­ing to make sense of my last sen­tence. I imag­ine this is what an egg must feel like before it hits a pan, only the dif­fer­ence is it takes much less time to cook scram­bled eggs than the twenty or so days left of this semester.

My tol­er­ance and my resolve is waver­ing. I find myself push­ing on only because there is a voice buried some­where in my head that assures me the light at the end of the tun­nel is actu­ally a race of alien beings who have come to save me.

This semes­ter was busier than most. As I turn over the reins of the Stu­dent Nurs­ing Orga­ni­za­tion (SNO) to a new group of capa­ble, and tal­ented nurs­ing stu­dents I feel some­what relieved. I’m hope­ful that I may one day be able to tol­er­ate the sound of my name and the muf­fled gig­gling of peo­ple in the piano room.

Nine time a winner

ReadersChoice

HACC wins reader’s choice award

Char­lotte Fiehn — Staff Writer

For nine straight years LancasterOnline.com has voted Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) the “Best Place to Take Col­lege Courses in Lancaster”.

To cel­e­brate the announce­ment stu­dents and fac­ulty were treated to free cup­cakes on Octo­ber 17, 2013 “We [gave] out cup­cakes in the lobby of the main build­ing,” says Cindy Shierk. “We also had a ban­ner to pro­mote the award.”

Indeed, Octo­ber became the month of school spirit, with wide­spread acknowl­edge­ment of the award on cam­pus and a day devoted to cel­e­brat­ing the school.

But HACC will also pro­mote its “Reader’s Choice” win in the build up to the Spring Semes­ter, not only to inspire cur­rent stu­dents, but also to help in the recruit­ment of new stu­dents for the new aca­d­e­mic year.

The award rec­og­nizes HACC as one of the most diverse and acces­si­ble options for college-level classes within the Lan­caster area. Tar­get­ing all man­ner of stu­dents, one of the things HACC is par­tic­u­larly good at is help­ing non-traditional stu­dents take the leap into the realm of higher edu­ca­tion. With more and more peo­ple falling into this cat­e­gory of the non­tra­di­tional stu­dent, and with the cost of edu­ca­tion con­tin­u­ing to rise, HACC’s offer­ings are cer­tainly keep­ing up with cur­rent trends.

As Lan­caster Cam­pus Vice Pres­i­dent, Lois Schaf­fer points out, “HACC is the favorite place to take col­lege courses for a vari­ety of rea­sons. [It] offers flex­i­bil­ity of course sched­ules, open admis­sions, low cost, vir­tual learn­ing options, schol­ar­ship oppor­tu­ni­ties, and dual enroll­ment trans­fer pro­grams. [It also] has open admis­sion, which pro­vides acces­si­bil­ity to a post-secondary edu­ca­tion to all stu­dents. We offer finan­cial aid and schol­ar­ship sup­port, as well as a mul­ti­tude of flex­i­ble and dif­fer­ent learn­ing envi­ron­ments from which stu­dents can choose such as vir­tual, blended, day, evening and week­end classes.”

Stu­dent Rachel Wat­son com­mented, “I chose HACC because I knew many peo­ple who were very happy with their expe­ri­ences at HACC and have gone on to become incred­i­bly suc­cess­ful. I trusted that HACC would pre­pare me in the same way for my own future success.”

Schaf­fer adds, “HACC pro­vides a vari­ety of stu­dent sup­port pro­grams such as coun­sel­ing and advis­ing, ori­en­ta­tion and foun­da­tional stud­ies courses, tutor­ing, career and trans­fer, and finan­cial aid.”

HACC Lancaster wins award

HACC Lan­caster wins award

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a bid to cul­ti­vate diver­sity in the stu­dent pop­u­la­tion and also pro­vide a wealth of oppor­tu­ni­ties, Schaf­fer also stressed the impor­tance of the vari­ety of stu­dent life, reten­tion and mul­ti­cul­tural pro­gram­ming oppor­tu­ni­ties, as well as sup­ports for spe­cial pop­u­la­tions such as stu­dents with dis­abil­i­ties, vet­er­ans, inter­na­tional and hon­ors students.

We will con­tinue to cel­e­brate by proudly dis­play­ing our ban­ner at stu­dent events through­out the year,” Schaf­fer said.

Success is in the details

Success

Sim­ple Tips for a strong semester

Desiree Kissinger — Staff Reporter

Col­lege offers oppor­tu­ni­ties. It is the last moment in our lives where we can live in the limbo between adult life and stu­dent, mostly obliv­i­ous to the real­i­ties that lie in wait the moment we reach grad­u­a­tion. Sure, we have the wor­ries of what to do, where to go, the jobs we’ll have to take, and the rela­tion­ships that will become more and more dif­fi­cult to main­tain. The four years of col­lege life seem to last for­ever and yet are over in a mere instant. It’s the first step­ping stone in a long path that leads to your future. Seems like a lot of pres­sure to put on four years of your life, right?

So what to do? How can one be the per­fect stu­dent while simul­ta­ne­ously being involved in clubs and events, and man­ag­ing daily life? How can we do it, besides the obvi­ous (and unat­tain­able) real­ity of cloning oneself?

There’s an Eng­lish proverb, that I’m sure a lot of you know, “Where there’s a will, there’s a way.” And this is my way.

Prepar­ing your house for the Semes­ter — Con­sider this; would you go on a long trip with­out first get­ting ready for that trip? No. Think of col­lege as your four-year trip to a bet­ter and brighter future. It is not some­thing that you just want to jump into, with­out get­ting ready for it. If you do that you are going to end up drown­ing in a pool of stress and get so over­whelmed that you just stop going. These first three steps are going to help you get ready for your semes­ter. The trick is repeat­ing these steps after each semester.

            Pre­pare a space in your house as your home­work space - In other words, clear off a desk or pur­chase one if you don’t have one, and put it in a secluded part of your house or apart­ment. Put every­thing that you will need for your assign­ments in the draw­ers of this desk: such as pen­cils, paper, a dic­tio­nary, and what­ever else you may need.

Hang up a bul­letin board - This may seem a lit­tle old fash­ioned to you, see­ing as you can now just put every­thing into a smart phone and have it at the tips of your fin­gers every day. How­ever, I find that I stay more orga­nized when I can see every­thing that needs to get done on a cal­en­dar. I per­son­ally color coor­di­nate all of my classes. A pack of fine-tip Sharpies in multi-colors makes short work of assign­ing each course a color. When you get your syl­labus on the first day of class, mark your cal­en­dar with all of the assign­ments that semes­ter. Be sure to mark days that the cam­pus is closed because noth­ing is worse than show­ing up to an empty class­room. Also be sure to print out your sched­ule and post this onto your bul­letin board. I find the cheap­est place to get them is at Michael’s.

Get orga­nized - If you study in a mess, you won’t be fully focused on the study mate­r­ial, but if you take time before the semes­ter begins to purge papers, clean up the desk­top on your com­puter, and get every­thing sit­u­ated, when the semes­ter begins you won’t have to worry about find­ing a high­lighter or a piece of paper.

Write and re-write your sched­ule — Put them in places, like your car, the bag you’ll be tak­ing to classes, your back pocket, and in your note­book. This will guar­an­tee when you for­get where your class is located, that you’ll be able to look it up.

            Orga­nize your notes — Buy a sin­gle sub­ject note­book for each class, along with one five sub­ject note­book. Put the five sub­ject note­book in your bag for class notes and home­work. Assign each of your classes a dif­fer­ent note­book, prefer­ably a dif­fer­ent color. The sin­gle sub­ject note­books are where you’ll neatly rewrite the class notes. This is actu­ally going to help you to study, espe­cially if you read the notes aloud as you’re writ­ing them.

            Write note cards every day after each lec­ture - This is impor­tant. It is com­mon knowl­edge that the more you repeat some­thing, the bet­ter you’ll remem­ber it. Note cards will be your hero when it comes time to study for the test.

            Write down your assign­ments — Always do this, even if you think that you’re going to remem­ber it, write it down any­way. Chances are by the time you get home, you’re not going to remem­ber that you have a twenty-five point review due next Mon­day. Invest in a nice plan­ner, one the size of a note­book. These plan­ners will give you room to write down all of your assign­ments, plus give you room to set goals for those long-term assign­ments. The stu­dent gov­ern­ment asso­ci­a­tion (SGA) pro­vides plan­ners free of charge to stu­dents. You can pick up a plan­ner in the SGA office in main 108.

            Do your home­work — Pro­fes­sors assign home­work for a rea­son. This gives you the oppor­tu­nity to ask ques­tions if you don’t under­stand a concept.

            Review your notes every day — If you review them every day, when the time comes to study for the test or final exam, it’ll be so much eas­ier and you won’t have to spend as much time hard-core studying.

            Go to every class — Sure, there are the rare cir­cum­stances where you just can’t make it to class, but try your best to get to every class. Miss­ing even two classes makes it dif­fi­cult to catch up in that class and keep on track.

If you fol­low these steps to a suc­cess­ful col­lege semes­ter, you’re col­lege semes­ter will be a suc­cess.  As the Olympics gold medal­ist, Jesse Owens once said “We all have dreams. But in order to make dreams into real­ity, it takes an awful lot of deter­mi­na­tion, ded­i­ca­tion, self-discipline, and effort.”

Muddy Run offers peace within

Quiet afternoons at Muddy Run.

Get­ting close to nature in Holt­wood, PA

Desiree Kissinger — Staff Writer

In today’s fast-paced soci­ety, there are few places that can make one for­get about the wor­ries and momen­tum of every­day life. Few places that offer a sanc­tu­ary and a day of peace, where one can get lost in the awe-inspiring beauty that nature holds. Most hik­ing trails and parks are over­flow­ing with peo­ple, all try­ing to spread out on a cou­ple acres of land, a con­stant reminder that the out­side world is just a mile or so away. If you’re like me, you like the idea of being in the mid­dle of nowhere, alone in your own thoughts. It’s a free­ing expe­ri­ence that is dif­fi­cult to find –unless you have the time and money to travel to the Ama­zon Rain­for­est. Prob­a­bly not, right?

 

How­ever, there is a place much closer that grants a lit­tle bit of that wild heaven with­out hav­ing to travel by plane. Imag­ine a place with a 40 acre-lake, one main trail, and 700 acres to explore. Mud­dyRun­Recre­ation­Park in Holton, PA (172 Bethesda Church Rd W) has all this and more.

 

On Sun­day Octo­ber 6, 2013, I made the short drive to Mud­dyRun­Recre­ation­Park, not for hik­ing but for kayak­ing. For those who have never been kayak­ing, it is a won­der­ful expe­ri­ence and a great upper body work­out. Why lift weights in a stuffy gym when you can get a sin­gle per­son kayak and explore a 40 acre lake for a cou­ple hours.

 

The expe­ri­ence was incred­i­ble. As a child, I had been boat­ing often but it was never as relax­ing as when I went kayak­ing. A large boat, while it has speed and power, also makes me feel sep­a­rated from nature. The wind whipped into my face and left a sting­ing sen­sa­tion that I highly dis­liked, and at high speeds, it was hard to catch my breath, or enjoy the nature around me.

 

Kayak­ing is a com­pletely dif­fer­ent feel­ing. Not only am I more in con­trol of my speed and where I’m going, but kayaks are smaller and closer to the water. When I am in a kayak, I feel as though I am con­nected to nature. There’s no angry roar of the motor, no yelling to talk to peo­ple, and it’s just calming.

 

At Muddy Run, I felt as if I were com­pletely con­nected to the wilder­ness, even though I was with a group. The burn in my mus­cles from pad­dling was con­trasted by the calm­ing peace I felt being sur­rounded by trees. The sounds of my pad­dles slid­ing through the water were around me and echoed off of the sur­face. The calm of the lake seemed to bring sounds in the dis­tance closer. My favorite sound how­ever, was the water lap­ping against my kayak as I moved it through the water.

 

A sud­den splash would indi­cate a fish jump­ing out of the water just a few inches in front of me. Herons would swim along the water’s edge, in a seem­ingly pre­dictable fash­ion, only to dis­ap­pear and reap­pear a few feet ahead. Large flocks of geese floated lazily in one of the alcoves, some­times get­ting spooked by the kayak­ers and all at once like a dance, spread­ing their wings and fly­ing in unison.

 

I would highly rec­om­mend going to Muddy Run for the entire day. The park has play­grounds and plenty of pic­nic tables. Muddy Run offers an expe­ri­ence rarely dupli­cated so close to met­ro­pol­i­tan areas. The park feels untouched by indus­try and allows vis­i­tors an expe­ri­ence not often had in a loca­tion so close to home.

HACC gives a spit

Keri Rodriguez, vice president of SNO reviews bone marrow information.

HACC and SNO host bone mar­row registry

Desiree Kissinger — Staff Writer

On Octo­ber 2, 2013, Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) and the stu­dent nurs­ing orga­ni­za­tion (SNO) gave stu­dents the oppor­tu­nity to reg­is­ter for the national mar­row donor program’s “Be the Match” reg­istry. The national mar­row donor pro­gram offers aver­age indi­vid­u­als, between the ages of 18 and 44 years of age, the oppor­tu­nity to save patients who are in need of a bone mar­row transplant.

            Stu­dents that wanted to join the reg­istry were asked to fill out a three page appli­ca­tion, sim­i­lar to a job appli­ca­tion. The reg­istry is open to every­one, includ­ing peo­ple that are unsure of their her­itage, or have got­ten tat­toos recently, and peo­ple with ane­mia. Along with the appli­ca­tion, there is also a con­sent form. The whole process takes about ten to fif­teen minutes.

            Keri Rodriguez, vice pres­i­dent of SNO, explained the test­ing process for the reg­istry. Inter­ested per­sons received a small binder that when opened con­tained four cot­ton swabs. The poten­tial donor then uses one swab for each side of his/her mouth, a sep­a­rate one for the top and bot­tom. Each side is swabbed for at least ten sec­onds each. The binder is then placed into an enve­lope and returned to the national mar­row donor volunteer.

            The kit is then shipped off to a lab that tests the swabs to see if the inter­ested per­son is a poten­tial donor for some­one who needs a bone mar­row trans­plant. “I think there’s a lot more peo­ple that are able to swab that aren’t,” com­mented Rodriguez.

            When some think of bone mar­row dona­tions, they imme­di­ately think of an over­sized nee­dle being stabbed into their hip and mar­row being painfully drawn into it. How­ever, that is a com­mon mis­con­cep­tion about bone mar­row dona­tions. In fact, bone mar­row aspi­ra­tion is rarely done. In the cases when mar­row dona­tion is nec­es­sary, the donor is under anes­the­sia, and the dona­tion is usu­ally an out­pa­tient pro­ce­dure. With mar­row aspi­ra­tion dona­tion, the donor is back to nor­mal within two to seven days.

            More com­monly dona­tion is a periph­eral blood stem cell (PBSC) dona­tion. Aimee Haskew, a vol­un­teer for “Be the Match” and a mem­ber of the reg­istry, donated periph­eral blood stem cells ear­lier this year. Haskew related the pro­ce­dure for a PBSC dona­tion to a blood dona­tion. In this type of dona­tion, donors receive a drug, called fil­gras­tim, which causes his or her blood to pro­duce extra blood-forming cells daily for five days. On day five, the donor goes to an out­pa­tient clinic and the extra blood-forming cells are sep­a­rated. The donor goes home the same day, and is back to nor­mal within two days.

            All of the peo­ple that were inter­viewed agreed that every­one should reg­is­ter for the “Be the Match” reg­istry.  Accord­ing to the “Be the Match” web­site (bethematch.org), only about one in every five-hundred and forty mem­bers will match a patient. The process is free for donors. All expenses are cov­ered by the national mar­row donor program.

Front Right Space Image

When asked why she donated, Haskew com­mented: “The rea­son why I did it was sim­ply because it was the right thing to do. I think when you’re younger; you’re not as touched by dis­ease. But I think as we all age, some­one in your life is going to affected by can­cer. I’ve had peo­ple in my life affected by can­cer. The per­son I donated for that was some­one daugh­ter, pos­si­bly a mother, a sis­ter, a wife. You never know who you’re sav­ing, so it’s the right thing to do.”

The great lie of media

Urban Outfitters no longer offers this shirt, or this model.

How Amer­ica is being swin­dled one chan­nel at a time

Shawn Reed - Editor-in-Chief

The week of Novem­ber 24, 2013 brought the announce­ment that Iran has pledged to freeze its nuclear pro­gram: the first day Hanukkah and Thanks­giv­ing are on the same date for the first time in 500 years (Prompt­ing Kanye West to declare that African Amer­i­cans have less oppor­tu­nity due to not being Jew­ish), an under­cover inves­ti­ga­tion in Florida lead to the arrest of 28 peo­ple, includ­ing a sub­sti­tute teacher in a child pornog­ra­phy ring, and Paul Walker from the “Fast and Furi­ous” died in a car acci­dent in California.

Granted this is not an exhaus­tive list of news from around the coun­try, or from around the world. If social media is to be believed the death of Paul Walker might call for a national day of mourn­ing. There is no ques­tion that to his fam­ily and friends the death of Walker is a tragedy, but to the rest of Amer­ica the real ques­tion is, why does this matter?

We live in a soci­ety that reminds us to sup­port our troops, but the almost 7,000 troops who have died dur­ing the Iraq and Afghanistan war hardly make the nightly news reels. While our politi­cians argue over health­care reform almost 51,000 vet­er­ans wounded dur­ing “The War on Ter­ror” are still fight­ing for ade­quate ben­e­fits, and timely med­ical treat­ment from the Veteran’s Health Admin­is­tra­tion Hospitals.

We live in a soci­ety that tells us phys­i­cal per­fec­tion must be obtained at all costs. We blindly go about our days point­ing out the fault of oth­ers (and more impor­tantly our­selves) with­out stop­ping to won­der who gains in this some­times deadly cycle. Amer­i­cans spend an esti­mated $55 bil­lion dol­lars on weight loss prod­ucts, and sup­ple­ments in the hopes of obtain­ing per­fec­tion, which is an illu­sion. We con­tinue in a cycle of self-flagellation in the hopes that one day we might be able to wear that “Eat Less” shirt from Urban Outfitters.

We live in a soci­ety that only seems to care about the poor and the home­less dur­ing the hol­i­day sea­son. The rest of the year we live in a cycle of class war­fare. The poor are poor because they don’t work hard enough. The specter of social­ism hangs over the heads of the coun­try, and peo­ple are manip­u­lated based on fear rather than con­cern for the greater good of the soci­ety. How is it that Trin­ity Broad­cast­ing Net­work can solicit $93 mil­lion dol­lars in dona­tions, but the home­less man we pass isn’t worth a hot cup of coffee?

Recently a study was pub­lished in the jour­nal of Social Psy­chol­ogy and Per­son­al­ity Sci­ence, the researchers; Hee­jung Park, Jean M. Twenge and Patri­cia M. Green­field exam­ined data from high school senior’s atti­tudes and val­ues from 1976 to 2010. They dis­cov­ered that dur­ing times of eco­nomic hard­ship young peo­ple look out­ward to impact the world at large. Are we ready for a shift in the idea of meaning?

We are no longer in a soci­ety where the pur­suit of wealth is para­mount to most Amer­i­cans, but accord­ing to media we are still liv­ing in the mid 1990’s where the gen­er­a­tion of credit and sub­prime loans is king. Media is no longer a reflec­tion of Amer­i­can val­ues, yet it is a tool to influ­ence our buy­ing deci­sions and our polit­i­cal affil­i­a­tions. Our polit­i­cal sys­tem has devolved into a com­plex game of foot­ball where Amer­i­cans find them­selves root­ing for one team or another with­out under­stand­ing the only team that mat­ters is our soci­ety as a whole.

We can change the world one block at a time. We can reach out to our neigh­bors, invest in local busi­nesses, and find ways to make our world energy effi­cient. We can change the mod­els of health­care to improve access to all who need it, and we can hold our politi­cians account­able for inac­tion in our com­mu­ni­ties. We can do this by refus­ing the largest lie repeated to us by media; that we are inef­fec­tive and apa­thetic, and we can stop becom­ing dis­tracted by the lives and deaths of celebri­ties. As a soci­ety we can exalt those who are mak­ing change. We can cel­e­brate intel­li­gence, and choose to respect real effort, instead of turn­ing on the tele­vi­sion and swal­low­ing the lie.

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