netflix-logo1

Netflix to raise prices for new members

Investor report reveals company’s stances and future plans Robert Beiler – Tech Editor The Q1 investor report released by Net­flix on April 21st, 2014 indi­cates that the stream­ing movie com­pany plans to raise their prices by as much as $2 a month. The com­pany did not release spe­cific details on when this would be exe­cuted, More »

Davies2

Allies: A new era

Allies gains a new president Shawn Reed — Editor-in-Chief Casey Davies, 22, com­puter sci­ence major, recently became the pres­i­dent of the Lan­caster cam­pus of Har­ris­bur­gArea­Com­mu­nity College’s (HACC) Allies club. Allies, has tra­di­tion­ally been a club of accep­tance, a safe space where stu­dents are free to be them­selves. “A com­mon mis­con­cep­tion about Allies is that we More »

Confessions of a registered nursing student

A student’s per­sonal jour­ney through the nurs­ing program Shawn Reed — Editor-in-Chief I think that in the final semes­ter of nurs­ing school there are two, deeply oppo­site emo­tions – relief and dread. Relief because the end is so in sight most of us can taste it. We’re apply­ing for jobs, think­ing about the state boards, More »

HACC turns 50

Daniel Bell — Man­ag­ing Editor   HACC’s 50th Anniversary! This year marks Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity College’s (HACC) 50th year of ser­vice. Estab­lished Feb­ru­ary 14, 1964 in Har­ris­burg HACC was Pennsylvania’s very first com­mu­nity col­lege. That first year HACC had a class of 426 stu­dents. This year there are some 22,000 stu­dents attend­ing col­lege across all More »

console wars photo by policymiccom

Game On!

Con­soles step up as the 8th gen­er­a­tion gets underway By Robert Beiler — Tech Editor While Nintendo’s suc­ces­sor to the Wii, dubbed the WiiU released on Novem­ber 18th in 2012, the 8th gen­er­a­tion of game con­soles offi­cially began when Sony and Microsoft entered the fray once again. With the release of the Playsta­tion 4 on More »

Rwanda Genocide: Lessons Learned

Carl Wilkens vis­its HACC Lan­caster to share first hand account of genocide by Danielle Shaver — Staff Writer On Feb­ru­ary 18th, Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) Lan­caster had the priv­i­lege of host­ing Carl Wilkens, for­mer head of the Adven­tist Devel­op­ment and Relief Agency Inter­na­tional in Rwanda. While many of Amer­i­cans have never heard of the More »

George Michael — Symphonica

George Michael

Shawn Reed — Editor-in-Chief

 

There is some­thing about lis­ten­ing to George Michael that demands the lis­tener wear a smok­ing jacket and hold a glass of mer­lot. “Sym­phon­ica” is the first album released by the for­mer Wham! mem­ber in ten years how­ever the album serves to remind fans just how amaz­ing Michael is live. “Sym­phon­ica” is an album best lis­tened to with high qual­ity head­phones to appre­ci­ate the mature style in which Michael breathes new life into clas­sic arrangements.

 

The album avail­able in both stan­dard and deluxe ver­sions fea­tures Michael dur­ing his “Sym­phon­ica” tour. Michael backed by a full orches­tra does a fine job remind­ing the lis­tener of how lush arrange­ments suit the cool tones of his voice, how­ever no new mate­r­ial appears on the album.

 

Sym­phon­ica” con­tains mostly cov­ers, and a few new arrange­ments from 2004’s “Patience” album (“John and Elvis Are Dead” and “Through”) but the album also offers an amaz­ing cover of “Let her down easy” orig­i­nally released by Ter­ence Trent D’Arby in 1993. Michael’s voice with the bal­lad seems far more nat­ural than the orig­i­nal D’Arby version.

 

With the release of “Patience” in 2004, Michael told fans it would be his last album. It seems that not only has the suc­cess of “Sym­phon­ica” rein­vig­o­rated a career that has spanned decades, but Michael is head­ing into the stu­dio to write and release an album of new mate­r­ial due for release in late 2014, to early 2015.

The war on wolves

Wolf

Cru­elty backed by the government

Danielle Shaver — Staff Writer

While most of us are aware of the Endan­gered Species Act (ESA), not all of us are aware it is under attack, and the first species under fire are wolves.

Groups with deep pock­ets are spread­ing mis­in­for­ma­tion about the Amer­i­can wolf. The Cat­tle­men Asso­ci­a­tion, big game hunt­ing orga­ni­za­tions, and the Depart­ment of Nat­ural Resources (DNR) are seek­ing to encour­age the hunt­ing of wolves in the wild.

The DNR is a gov­ern­ment agency respon­si­ble for a lot of the car­nage, and have few guide­lines to fol­low. Wolves are blamed for cat­tle loss, killing humans, and deplet­ing herds, such as elk, deer, and cari­bou. Frankly, it makes me sick how quickly we for­get the past.

            Wolves were rein­tro­duced in 1995 to Yel­low­stone National Park to restore bal­ance. The park was begin­ning to suf­fer because too many herds were over­graz­ing. When the wolves were rein­tro­duced to Yel­low­stone the over graz­ing stopped, and slowly the park came back to life.

            Wolves are known as a key­stone species because they keep the bal­ance in the ecosys­tems. Herds can sense them and instead of remain­ing in the same loca­tion con­sis­tently, they will move fre­quently, end­ing over­graz­ing. Wolves will only hunt as a pack, and as a pack they will only take a sin­gle kill, not an entire herd as spe­cial inter­est groups would want you to believe. They gen­er­ally will sin­gle out the weak­est ani­mal in the herd, which in fact helps the herd remain healthy and strong. The rea­son these groups blame wolves for killing the game is because the hunters now have to work a lit­tle to track the herds. They no longer stay in open mead­ows where they are eas­ily shot.

            Where cat­tle are con­cerned, wolves rarely kill these ani­mals. A wolf can smell what the ani­mal has eaten and cat­tle smell of the chem­i­cals that they are fed. The fact is a mere one per­cent of cat­tle are killed by wolves. Put into per­spec­tive 60 per­cent of cat­tle die from dis­ease and lack of care, also known as human error. Accord­ing to an arti­cle in the Billings Gazette John Steu­ber, direc­tor of U.S. Wildlife Ser­vices for Mon­tana said, “Wolves were the sus­pect in the deaths of 61 cows, 378 calves, three guard dogs and two herd dogs inves­ti­gated by U.S. Wildlife, Steu­ber said. But coy­otes were a force. Coy­otes killed five adult cat­tle, 449 calves, 228 adult sheep, 3004 lambs, 35 goats and 18 chick­ens.”

            These inter­est groups are so far gone with fear and hate they have paid large amounts of money to lobby con­gress in order to remove wolves from the ESA. Mon­tana, Idaho, and Wyoming and other wolf hat­ing states use tax­payer money to hire pro­fes­sional snipers to shoot entire packs from the air. Some wolves are hunted and ripped apart by up to five dogs when already injured from being shot or caught in traps. Some wolves suf­fer a slow painful death, caught in traps and snares even­tu­ally dying from expo­sure, shock, dehy­dra­tion. Some hunters believe in play­ing on the wolves instincts to pro­tect pups and make record­ings of pup mur­ders to lure wolves out of the parks pro­tec­tion. They may be set dens ablaze, where moth­ers nurse their new born pups, or fill dens with lethal gas. These meth­ods are all sup­ported by DNR, and this is part of our taxes at work.

            The sad truth is, these traps also kill pets and humans alike. Traps are allowed to be set any­where, includ­ing pri­vate prop­erty, with­out the owner’s con­sent or knowl­edge. If an unwanted trap is found and dis­as­sem­bled the per­son who inter­fered with the trap could face fines. This is the truth behind these cruel acts. These actions take us from 2014, back to the 1800’s where we did not know the impor­tant role this key­stone species truly play within the ecosystem.

 

While doing research, I ven­tured onto the anti-wolf sites and found them phys­i­cally sick­en­ing. Peo­ple actu­ally enjoy shoot­ing a wolf in the gut and watch­ing bleed to death in obvi­ous agony. The men­tal­ity and com­ments about their actions comes close to that of ser­ial killers. Please do not mis­un­der­stand; I am not against hunt­ing in gen­eral. I come from a long line of hunters, but the point of hunt­ing is to feed your fam­ily, not inflict as much pain as pos­si­ble for the sake of killing. The major­ity of hunters will tell you to shoot to kill make it as quick as possible.

            This is hap­pen­ing right now, and has been for nearly two years. The United States gov­ern­ment does not want the major­ity of the pub­lic to be aware, because the groups who know and are fight­ing on behalf of the wolves are mak­ing the process of dri­ving the species to extinc­tion much more dif­fi­cult. Some of these groups such as, Wildlife Defense have taken it to the Supreme Court armed with thou­sands of sig­na­tures and sci­en­tific data that the hunters and ranch­ers do not wish to acknowledge.

            Our wildlife should not be for sale. What hap­pens if the wolves are lost for­ever this time? What hap­pens when the national park is destroyed because all the preda­tors were killed off? This war is not just wolves, but with all preda­tors those who truly keep the bal­ance. We as cit­i­zens have a right to know what our gov­ern­ment is doing, and we have a right to be heard and lis­tened to when we see actions we believe are wrong.

            We can all make this change hap­pen by doing our own research, sign­ing peti­tions, and join­ing national ral­lies that are tak­ing place across the coun­try and the cap­i­tal. We as stu­dents have a respon­si­bil­ity to inform our­selves about what is going on in our own coun­try. We are the future. What will the future be like for us or our chil­dren if we let our wildlife be destroyed because of igno­rance? We must band together and grow stronger and louder.

            Last spring there were mul­ti­ple ral­lies held across the coun­try, as well as a national rally that met in the cap­i­tal city and ended in the front of the White House. Thou­sands of peti­tions have already been signed, and thanks to the inter­net and social media sites a plat­form has been given to those who seek to edu­cate the public.

            Through sites like Face­book, I am able to keep in touch with oth­ers from around the globe where wolves and other ani­mals are under attack, as well as being part of another national rally at Yel­low­stone National Park planned for the week­end of June 27– 29, 2014. If you are inter­ested in learn­ing more about the ESA attack, or the war that the wolves are now fac­ing, I encour­age you to do your own research. I have been fol­low­ing this issue since it first began in late 2011 and I am hor­ri­fied it is not only pro­gress­ing in favor of money but also in violence.

 

            The cold hard truth is if things con­tinue in this way wolves will be extinct in the wild in a mere 5– 10 years tops. That is not such a long time away, and the effects from los­ing a key­stone species will be dev­as­tat­ing. Is money really worth the loss of a wilder­ness icon and the parks in which they live?

 

Myself, and thou­sands of other Amer­i­cans, do not think so.

Netflix to raise prices for new members

netflix-logo1

Investor report reveals company’s stances and future plans

Robert Beiler – Tech Editor

The Q1 investor report released by Net­flix on April 21st, 2014 indi­cates that the stream­ing movie com­pany plans to raise their prices by as much as $2 a month. The com­pany did not release spe­cific details on when this would be exe­cuted, but CEO Reed Hast­ings is quoted as stat­ing it “would be a one or two dol­lar increase, depend­ing on the coun­try”. He also stated that exist­ing mem­bers would stay at their cur­rent price for a “gen­er­ous amount of time” which will be between one and two years.

Allies: A new era

Davies2

Allies gains a new president

Shawn Reed — Editor-in-Chief

Casey Davies, 22, com­puter sci­ence major, recently became the pres­i­dent of the Lan­caster cam­pus of Har­ris­bur­gArea­Com­mu­nity College’s (HACC) Allies club. Allies, has tra­di­tion­ally been a club of accep­tance, a safe space where stu­dents are free to be them­selves. “A com­mon mis­con­cep­tion about Allies is that we are described as being the les­bian, gay, bisex­ual, trans­gen­dered (LGBT) club on cam­pus and this isn’t com­pletely true. Allies is a safe haven for those seek­ing out equal love and equal­ity amongst all groups,” said Davies.

 

Confessions of a registered nursing student

A student’s per­sonal jour­ney through the nurs­ing program

Shawn Reed — Editor-in-Chief

I think that in the final semes­ter of nurs­ing school there are two, deeply oppo­site emo­tions – relief and dread. Relief because the end is so in sight most of us can taste it. We’re apply­ing for jobs, think­ing about the state boards, plan­ning our grad­u­a­tion par­ties, and allow­ing other peo­ple to call us nurses. The dread is from the real­iza­tion that soon we’ll be out in the world, with­out the safety net of school and our friends, try­ing to make sense of a sys­tem that a good deal of us have very lit­tle expe­ri­ence in.

 

HACC turns 50

Daniel Bell — Man­ag­ing Editor

 

HACC’s 50th Anniversary!

This year marks Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity College’s (HACC) 50th year of ser­vice. Estab­lished Feb­ru­ary 14, 1964 in Har­ris­burg HACC was Pennsylvania’s very first com­mu­nity col­lege. That first year HACC had a class of 426 stu­dents. This year there are some 22,000 stu­dents attend­ing col­lege across all of the 5 cam­puses and online, which is roughly 50 times what it was in that very first year.

 

Game On!

console wars photo by policymiccom

Con­soles step up as the 8th gen­er­a­tion gets underway

By Robert Beiler — Tech Editor

While Nintendo’s suc­ces­sor to the Wii, dubbed the WiiU released on Novem­ber 18th in 2012, the 8th gen­er­a­tion of game con­soles offi­cially began when Sony and Microsoft entered the fray once again. With the release of the Playsta­tion 4 on Novem­ber 15th 2013 and Xbox One on Novem­ber 22nd, all three of the major brands in the last two con­sole cycles were finally available.

Rwanda Genocide: Lessons Learned

Carl Wilkens vis­its HACC Lan­caster to share first hand account of genocide

by Danielle Shaver — Staff Writer

On Feb­ru­ary 18th, Har­ris­burg Area Com­mu­nity Col­lege (HACC) Lan­caster had the priv­i­lege of host­ing Carl Wilkens, for­mer head of the Adven­tist Devel­op­ment and Relief Agency Inter­na­tional in Rwanda.

While many of Amer­i­cans have never heard of the geno­cide that took over Rwanda in 1994, Wilkens and his fam­ily had a first-hand expe­ri­ence with the atroc­i­ties of geno­cide. For 100 days the geno­cide con­tin­ued dur­ing which 800,000 peo­ple lost their lives.

There was ten­sion already in this area, and in 1990 Carl Wilkens and his wife Teresa and their young chil­dren moved to the cap­i­tal city of Kigali. They were human­i­tar­ian work­ers for Adven­tist Devel­op­ment and Relief Agency (ADRA). They became part of the com­mu­nity. Their lives became that of the peo­ple they served. They ate meals with their neigh­bors, they social­ized within their com­mu­nity, and their chil­dren played with the neigh­bor­hood children.

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: search engine optimization company | Thanks to seo service, seo companies and internet marketing company